SunnySide
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  • January7th

    Dinah Ansley’s Afton Mountain Home

    The SunnySide Band in Waynesboro, VA

    A Grand Time was had by all at the Breaking Up Christmas Gathering at Dinah Ansley’s lovely Afton Mountain Home yesterday.  There were Dulcimer pluckers, Banjo pluckers, acoustic guitar pluckers, autoharp pluckers and up-right bass pluckers all in a big huddle just enjoying making old-time mountain music.  I almost forgot — there was some “flat-footin’” going on too!  Can’t wait for the next get-to-gather.

    The SunnySide Band would like to invite you to visit their Music page and listen to a few of their favorite selections, then visit their Gigs page to see where they will be performing next.  If you are planning an event, The Band would encourage you to have them come and share their energetic music with your guests — just visit our Book Us page!

  • February19th

    Jim Lloyd and Trevor McKensey

    Carol Phillips' Grandfather's fiddle

    The SunnySide Band changed it’s mind completely and went to Blue Ridge Community College Friday night instead of The Stone Soup.  The College presented a program of Old Time Mountain Music by Jim Lloyd and Trevor McKensey from Rural Retreat, Virginia.  Great music and story telling.  Jim Lloyd played acoustic guitar and banjo and Trevor McKensey played acoustic guitar, banjo and fiddle.  Hands were clapping and toes were tapping everywhere!

    The SunnySide Band would like to invite you to visit their Home page and their Music page and listen to a few of their favorite old time and classic country selections.  The Band would also encourage you to have them play for your next event — just visit their Book Us page and leave your information.

  • May4th

    AKA “The Dixie Dewdrop”

    The SunnySide Band at The Rec Center

    Born David Harrison Macon, Uncle Dave Macon was an American banjo player, singer and comedian.  He gained regional fame as a vaudeville performer in the early 1920’s before going on to become the first star of the Grand Ole Opry.  Macon’s music is considered the ultimate bridge between 19th century American folk and vaudeville music and the phonograph and radio based music of the early 20th century.  Macon’s polished stage presence and lively personality have made him one of the most enduring figures of early country music.

    The SunnySide Band’s acoustic guitar player, Jim Lilly performs one of Uncle Dave Macon’s most popular hits, “Keep My Skillet Good and Greasy” to the delight of everyone.  The Band invites you to visit their Home page and their Music page to hear some of their other favorite old time tunes and then visit their Gigs page to see where they will be performing next.  While you are looking, The SunnySide Band invites you to visit their Feedback page to leave them a comment and let them know what you think.  The Band would like to meet you and share their music with you, and what better way to do this than to have them play for your next event.  Just visit their Contact page and fill in the blanks–they will do the rest!

  • May3rd

    Moran Lee Boggs

    Carol Phillips Grandmother

    Carol Phillip's Grandmother – Posted on The Wall of Music in the Old Homestead Museum

    Dock Boggs was an influential old-time singer, songwriter and banjo player.  His style of banjo playing as well as his singing is considered a unique combination of Appalachian folk music and African American blues.  Boggs was initially recorded in 1927 and again in 1929, although he worked primarily as a coal miner for most of his life.  He was “rediscovered” by the F.O.T.M. members during the folk music revival of the 1960’s, and spent much of his life playing at various folk music festivals and recording for Folkways Records.

    The SunnySide Band would like to invite you to visit their Home page and their Music page to listen to a sample of their favorite old time tunes, then they invite you to visit their Gigs page to see where they will be performing next.  The Band would also like to invite you to visit their Feedback page and leave them a comment.  The SunnySide Band would like to meet you and share their music with you, so they hope you will consider having them play for your next event.  Just visit their Contact page and fill in the blanks–The Band will be in touch with you.

  • May2nd

    Another F.O.T.M. Find

    Jim Lilly's Guitar

    Clarence Ashley learned to play banjo when he was 8 years old, and he was 12 years old when he learned how to play the acoustic guitar.  There wasn’t much work back in the early years, so he joined a medicine show when he was 16 and toured as a banjo picker and a singer.  He played with many musicians through the years, but in the late forties he injured his index finger and stopped playing.  Had it not been for a chance meeting with Ralph Rinzler of the F.O.T.M. in 1960, thousands of people would not have heard his banjo picking and singing.  Ralph encouraged Clarence to pick up his banjo again, and fortunately he did.  He formed a group that included Doc Watson from Deep Gap, NC, and they recorded two albums for Folkways.

    The SunnySide Band would like to invite you to visit their Home page and their Music page to hear some of their favorite old time tunes, and then visit their Gigs page to see where they will be performing next.  The Band would encourage you to visit their Feedback page and leave them a comment.  The SunnySide Band would like to meet you and share their music with you, so think about having them perform at your next event.  Just visit their Contact page and fill in the blanks–they will be in touch.

  • May1st

    Doc Watson

    Posted in: Music

    Prominent Musician and Song Writer

    Jim Lilly's Guitar

    He was born on March 2, 1923 Arthel Lane “Doc” Watson in Deep Gap, NC and was visually impared from birth.  He is recognized as one of the few remaining links to 1930’s and ’40’s string band music.  He was born into a family with a rich musical tradition–his mother sung traditional secular songs as well as gospel songs and his father played the banjo.  Doc’s early instrumental experience was with the harmonica and a homemade banjo, but at age thirteen he taught himself the chords to “When the Roses Bloom in Dixieland” on a borrowed acoustic guitar.

    The SunnySide Band did not record a Doc Watson song on their CD, but they do perform several of his tunes.  The SunnySide Band invites you to visit their Home page and their Music page to listen to some of their favorite old time or roots music tunes, they would also encourage you to visit their Gigs page to see where they will be performing next.  The Band hopes you will visit their Feedback page and leave them a comment.  The SunnySide Band would like to meet you and share their music with you and the best way to do that is to have them play for your next event.  Just visit their Contact page and fill in the blanks–one of the band members will get back to you.

  • April29th

    Traditional Music Goes to City Audiences

    Carol Phillips' Grandfather's fiddle

    During the 1920’s, the record companies began sending recording crews to the American South to record traditional music by Black and White musicians.  Records by African-American blues singers and songsters were typically marketed as “race records.”  Those by White fiddlers, banjo players, and family singing groups were sold as “old familiar tunes” or simply “old time music.”  Among those who were recorded during the heyday of the ’20’s were Clarence Ashley, Uncle Dave Macon, Mississippi John Hurt, the Carter Family, Furry Lewis, and Dock Boggs.  The record companies did an extraordinary job of documenting rural Southern music through the late 1920’s until their activities were sharply curtailed by the Great Depression.

    The SunnySide Band would invite you to visit their Home page and their Music page to give a listen to some of their old time music selections, then browse on to their Gigs page to see where they will be performing next.  The Band would also invite you to visit their Feedback page to leave a comment or two.  The SunnySide Band would like to meet you and share their music with you, and what better way to do that than to have them play for your next event.  Just visit their Contact page and fill in the blanks–they will be in touch.

  • April18th

    Lonesome Tunes

    Posted in: Music

    Seventh in the Series of Old Time Songs

    Carol Phillips Grandmother

    Carol Phillip's Grandmother – Posted on The Wall of Music in the Old Homestead Museum

    Life in the mountains was often a lonely existence.  Although there were dance tunes to perk things up, many of the slower songs had a mighty lonesome sound.  To get this sound, the banjos were often tuned in “sawmill tuning” (gDGCD) and the fiddles in “cross tuning” (AEAE).  The singers would shade their voices toward the minor sounding songs.  The results might be called “mountain blues.”  An example of one of these lonesome tunes is called Shady Grove, and it just so happens that Jim Lilly is teaching The SunnySide Band that tune this month.

    The SunnySide Band invites you to visit our Home page and our Music page to hear a sample of the other Roots Music tunes that we play.  We would also like for you to visit our Gigs page to see where we will be performing in the near future — come join us — we have lots of fun.  We would encourage you to visit our Feedback page to leave us a comment and then visit our Contact page and consider having The Band play for your next fun-filled event.  Thank you for stopping by and reading my Blog!!