SunnySide
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  • October10th

    Come Tap Your Toes With Us

    The SunnySide Band at The Rec Center

    The SunnySide Band will be at The Rec Center, 213 William Street, Fredericksburg on Friday, October 12 from 8:00 to 11:00pm.  Carol and Jim will be “Bringing the Mountain Sound to Your Ears” once again with Roots and Old-Time Music.   Betty will be bringing you some of those Classic Country tunes that she does so well.   Come tap your toes wil us.

    The SunnySide Band would like to invite you to visit their Music page and listen to a few of their selections and then visit their Gigs page to see where they will be performing in the near future.

  • May1st

    Doc Watson

    Posted in: Music

    Prominent Musician and Song Writer

    Jim Lilly's Guitar

    He was born on March 2, 1923 Arthel Lane “Doc” Watson in Deep Gap, NC and was visually impared from birth.  He is recognized as one of the few remaining links to 1930’s and ’40’s string band music.  He was born into a family with a rich musical tradition–his mother sung traditional secular songs as well as gospel songs and his father played the banjo.  Doc’s early instrumental experience was with the harmonica and a homemade banjo, but at age thirteen he taught himself the chords to “When the Roses Bloom in Dixieland” on a borrowed acoustic guitar.

    The SunnySide Band did not record a Doc Watson song on their CD, but they do perform several of his tunes.  The SunnySide Band invites you to visit their Home page and their Music page to listen to some of their favorite old time or roots music tunes, they would also encourage you to visit their Gigs page to see where they will be performing next.  The Band hopes you will visit their Feedback page and leave them a comment.  The SunnySide Band would like to meet you and share their music with you and the best way to do that is to have them play for your next event.  Just visit their Contact page and fill in the blanks–one of the band members will get back to you.

  • April27th

    Ralph Rinzler, John Cohen and Israel Young

    Carol Phillips' Grandfather's fiddle

    Ralph Rinzler was the first director of F.O.T.M., manager of Doc Watson and Bill Monroe, later director of the Newport Folk Foundation, and finally an assistant secretary of the Smithsonian Institution.  John Cohen was a painter and photographer and visited eastern Kentucky in 1959 to record and photograph traditional musicians.  The trip produced the Folkways album Mountain Music of Kentucky, which introduced the music of Roscoe Holcomb.  A return trip in 1962 yielded Cohen’s first film, The High Lonesome Sound.  Israel Young’s parents owned the Folklore Center on New York’s Lower East Side, and in addition to selling books, magazines, records and musical instruments, Israel Young produced folk music concerts in his store and rented halls.

    The SunnySide Band invites you to visit their Home page and their Music page to hear their version of some of these Old Time or Roots Music songs recorded in the ’20’s, ’30’s and ’40’s.  The Band would also encourage you to visit their Gigs page to see where they will be performing next and to visit their Feedback page to leave them a comment.  The SunnySide Band would like to meet you and share their music with you and what better way to do that than to have them play for your next event.  Just visit their Contact page and fill in the blanks–The Band will do the rest.

  • April26th

    The Folk Arrival 1961-1965

    Carol Phillips Grandmother

    Carol Phillip's Grandmother – Posted on The Wall of Music in the Old Homestead Museum

    From 1961 through 1965, the Friends of Old Time Music (F.O.T.M.) brought fourteen concerts of traditional folk music (roots music), old time country music (classic country music), bluegrass, blues and gospel music to New York City audiences.  The concerts represented the first New York appearances–often the first performances before urban “folk” audiences–by many of the most influential traditional musicians of the 20th century including Clarence Ashley, Doc Watson, Mississippi John Hurt, Maybelle Carter, Fred McDowell, Roscoe Holcomb, and Dock Boggs.

    The SunnySide Band invites you to visit their Home page and their Music page to listen to their version of old time music and classic country music songs by some of the musicians mentioned above.  The Band also invites you to visit their Gigs page to see where they will be performing in the near future and to visit their Feedback page and leave them a comment.  The SunnySide Band would like to meet you and share their music with you, so they would encourage you to consider having them play for your next event.  Just visit the Contact page and fill in the blanks–they will do the rest.

  • April20th

    An example of the Gospel Songs that I blogged about yesterday

    SunnySide Band

    Shall We Gather at the River is an old-time or roots music gospel song written by Robert Lowry in 1864.  It was first recorded on May 10, 1927 by the Dixie Sacred Singers composed of Uncle Dave Macon, along with Sam and Kirk McGee.  It was, incidently, one of Uncle Dave’s favorite hymns.

    The SunnySide Band enjoys singing Gospel songs, and we invite you to visit our Music page to listen to some of our favorite songs.  The fourth song on our CD, Singing On the Mountainside is an original gospel song that Jim Lilly and his wife, Melanie Davis wrote.   If you like what you hear, we invite you to visit our Gigs page to see where we will be performing next, and to visit our Feedback page to let us know how you feel about the group.  The SunnySide Band would love to meet you and share our music with you, so we encourage you to consider having us play for your next event.  Just visit our Contact page and fill in the blanks–we’ll do the rest!  In case you haven’t seen enough of us, we think you should look at our Gallery 2011.  Let us know what you think!!

  • April19th

    Gospel Songs

    Posted in: Music

    The Eighth and Final in the Series of Old Time Songs

    SunnySide Band

    Gospel songs have been an essential part of old-time or roots music from the very beginning.  Virtually all of the early singers learned the rudiments of music in church or from singing school teachers who often traveled the country by horseback.  These teachers would stop in a community and teach note reading as well as “shaped-note” singing.  Many times such classes constituted the only formal instruction that most people ever had.  The gospel songs are especially singable because they don’t depend on instruments to make them sound good.

    The SunnySide Band invites you to visit their Home page and their Music page to hear some of their favorite gospel songs.  We would also encourage you to visit our Gigs page to see where The Band will be performing next and to visit our Feedback page to leave us a comment.  The SunnySide Band would like to meet you and share their music with you, so we hope you will consider having us play for your next event.  The Contact page is available for you to leave your information, and we will be in touch with you.

  • April18th

    Lonesome Tunes

    Posted in: Music

    Seventh in the Series of Old Time Songs

    Carol Phillips Grandmother

    Carol Phillip's Grandmother – Posted on The Wall of Music in the Old Homestead Museum

    Life in the mountains was often a lonely existence.  Although there were dance tunes to perk things up, many of the slower songs had a mighty lonesome sound.  To get this sound, the banjos were often tuned in “sawmill tuning” (gDGCD) and the fiddles in “cross tuning” (AEAE).  The singers would shade their voices toward the minor sounding songs.  The results might be called “mountain blues.”  An example of one of these lonesome tunes is called Shady Grove, and it just so happens that Jim Lilly is teaching The SunnySide Band that tune this month.

    The SunnySide Band invites you to visit our Home page and our Music page to hear a sample of the other Roots Music tunes that we play.  We would also like for you to visit our Gigs page to see where we will be performing in the near future — come join us — we have lots of fun.  We would encourage you to visit our Feedback page to leave us a comment and then visit our Contact page and consider having The Band play for your next fun-filled event.  Thank you for stopping by and reading my Blog!!

  • April16th

    Pickin’ at the KOA

    Motor Home Club in Massaponax

    Did you miss me??  The Blogging part of The SunnySide Band is on a camping trip, and the campground is in a zone with little to no reception.  Thursday and Friday were both no reception days, but now that it is raining, the reception is good for me to let you know what The Band is doing.  The SunnySide Band put on a Free Concert for The KOA Kampground last night, and we saw many smiles and toes a-tappin’.  We played our best and favorite roots tunes, and many folks in the audience made requests for their favorite tunes.  The SunnySide Band loves to honor requests.  The camping season is just getting started, so the attendance was small but enthusiastic.

    The SunnySide Band invites you to visit their Home page and our Music page to listen to our favorite roots tunes, and to also visit our Gigs page to see where we will be performing in the near future.  We invite you to visit our Feedback page to leave us a comment and let us know what you think of  The Band and what you think of our Website.  The Band would love to meet you and share our music with you, so we hope you will consider having us play for your next event.  Just visit our Contact page and leave your information.  We would also like to share with you the many venues that we have played, so please visit our Gallery 2011 page and travel with us.

  • April13th

    Ticklin’ Songs

    Posted in: Music

    The Fifth in the Series of Old Time Songs

    The SunnySide Band Radio Interview

    Ticklin’ songs are nothing more or less than songs that make you laugh.  Country people have always enjoyed a good laugh, even if the joke’s on them.  The SunnySide Band always includes several of these songs in their performances, one that comes to mind is “The Four Days Drunk Song” or “The Cabbage Head Song.”  If you have not heard this song, you need to come to one of our Gigs and hear and see us in action.  It’s guaranteed to make you laugh.

    The SunnySide Band invites you to visit our Home page and our Music page to listen to our favorite old-time or roots music songs and visit our Gigs page to see where we will be performing in the near future.  We invite you to visit our Feedback page to leave us a comment, and we would encourage you to purchase one of our CD’s so you can listen to The SunnySide Band and tap your toes.  We would like to meet you and share our music with you, so we would encourage you to consider having SunnySide play for your next event.  Just visit our Contact page and fill in the form with your information — we will get back to you right away.  Don’t forget to visit our Gallery page and share our venues with us.

  • April12th

    Fourth in the Series of Old-Time Songs

    Back Are You From Dixie

    A “knockdown tune” is a rough and tumble banjo song that is likely to be played at breakneck tempos.  Banjoists who played these old-time or roots tunes generally played in a style variously known as clawhammer, thumb-cocking, rapping, frailing, and banging the banjo.  It is also known as the “knockdown style.”  This rhythmic style was created to back up the fiddler at dances long before mail order houses made acoustic guitars available.  Knockdown banjo playing was far more versatile than merely providing rhythm for dances, it could easily be used to accompany all manner of songs by laying down a firm rhythm foundation while at the same time playing melodies to compliment the singing of the old songs.

    The SunnySide Band doesn’t use a banjo in their performances, but I have heard Jim Lilly do a fabulous job of  “clawhammer” style banjo playing.  We invite you to visit our Home page and our Music page to listen to some of our favorite old-time tunes.  We also invite you to visit our Gigs page to see where The SunnySide Band will be performing in the near future and then visit our Feedback page to leave us a comment about the band and our Website.  We would like to meet you and share our music with you, so we encourage you to consider having The SunnySide Band play for your next event.  Leave us your information on our Contact page, and we will take care of the rest.